NSW COMBINED HIGH SCHOOLS SPORTS ASSOCIATION

NORTH WESTERN METROPOLITAN

 HIGH SCHOOLS SPORTS ASSOCIATION

 

 

CRICKET

 

 

DAY’S PLAY

  • Matches are expected to be started promptly at 1pm.
  • Coaches must ensure that the maximum number of overs for each day of play, in any format, are completed (as set out in these rules).
  • The reduction in the number of overs played should only be as a result of weather delays.
  • If fewer than ten (10) completed overs are bowled on the first day, the match will then be played as a one day game the following week. The overs on the first day will not be counted towards the final result and a new toss must take place before the start of play on the second day.

 

Every effort should be made to speed up play so that 17 overs are bowled per hour.  

Coaches should insist that:

  • The next two batsmen are padded up.
  • The outgoing and incoming batsmen cross halfway between the wicket and the boundary.
  • Drinks are taken by all players on the field only at a designated drinks break.
  • Drinks breaks are to be limited to 5 minutes.
  • Fielders move quickly to their new positions after each over.
  • Captains nominate the next bowler before the over in progress is completed.

 

DELAYS AND INTERRUPTIONS

  • The decision as to whether play should commence because of the condition of the ground rests with the groundsman.
  • If no groundsman is present then the decision to commence play rests with the official umpire(s).
  • If no groundsman or official umpire(s) are present then the decision to commence play rests with the coaches.
  • Once play has commenced, the decision to interrupt or call off play rests first with the official umpire(s), and then with both coaches.
  • The groundsman, however, can override any decision by an official umpire or the coaches as to whether play should commence, be interrupted, or be called off.
  • If time is lost through an interruption, play can be extended by up to a maximum of 30 minutes past the suggested match finish time as set out in these rules.
  • One over is to be deducted for every 3 ½ minutes lost in the match.
  • One drinks break per day can be taken at the request of the fielding side (usually when half of the allotted overs in the day’s play have been bowled).
  • In hot weather, if umpires/coaches agree prior to the start of play, a quick second drinks break can be taken.
  • At the change of innings there should be a break of, at most, 10 minutes.
  • Two (2) overs are lost in the day’s play due to the change of innings.

 

HOURS OF PLAY

  • Coaches must ensure that the maximum number of overs are completed for each day of play as set out in these rules. Every effort must be made to start the match on time.
  • Coaches are not to agree on playing reduced over matches contrary to the Zone rules.
  • Cricket is a game that requires as much time as possible in the day to be played properly. This encourages more students to be involved in the match through some form whether it be bat, ball, or in the field. We want all students who are giving up their afternoons travelling to venues to be allowed the opportunity to play as much cricket as possible in the day.

 

Two day games:

1st Grade 

  • 40 overs per day’s play from 1pm to 3:30pm (whichever comes second)

 

2nd Grade, 15s and 14s

  • 30 overs per day’s play from 1pm to 3pm (whichever comes second)

 

One day games:

1st Grade:                   20 overs per side from 1pm to 3:30pm

2nd Grade, 15s & 14s  20 overs per side from 1pm to 3:30pm

  

RESPONSIBILITIES OF SCHOOLS

 

Each school:

  • Should provide a competent umpire. It is recommended that official umpires be used wherever possible, especially for the officiating of finals matches.
  • Must provide a 156g red two-piece leather cricket ball. Schools must use an Australian made ball Kookaburra Red King or Kookaburra Colt. Lesser quality balls can be very hard having a much higher potential for breaking bats.
  • Should provide three stumps and two bails.
  • Should provide a scorebook and a competent scorer.

- The scorers must sit together and agree on the score at the end of each over.   Any dispute in the score should be referred to the umpires immediately.

  • Should provide boundary markers as the sport specific guidelines for cricket and boundary fences require for enclosed grounds boundaries, these should be marked by cones 2 metres inside the fence line. This will reduce or avoid injuries to players who slide to stop the ball reaching the boundary.

 

  • Sports organisers must advise schools and students for 1st Grade matches of the type of wicket to be used so that players may bring appropriate footwear (i.e. spikes for Turf wickets or running shoes for Synthetic wickets).

  

MEMBERS OF THE TEAM

 

  • In all grades, teams may play 12 players of whom 11 can bat and 11 can bowl.
  • Players are to be nominated, written on a team sheet and made available to the opposing team prior to the toss.
  • All supervising teacher/s must have a complete team roll with correct age marked clearly on the roll to be shown to opposition coaches if requested prior, during or after the match.
  • There is no requirement for teams to nominate the non-bowler or non-batter prior to the toss.
  • A student who is not on the team sheet is allowed to field as a rotation in the fielding 11 but they are not allowed to bat or bowl.
  • In junior grades (14’s and 15’s), coaches may agree prior to the toss to nominate more than 12 players on the team sheet so as to encourage more players at a junior level to be involved in grade cricket, however the ‘11 players can bowl and 11 players can bat’ rule still applies.

 

PLAYING EQUIPMENT AND APPAREL

 

  • All batsmen must wear a helmet with faceguard.
  • Wicket keepers must wear a helmet with faceguard when keeping immediately up to and next to the stumps.
  • A fielder must wear a helmet when fielding in close to the batsman within 10 metres.

 

All players must wear recognised cricket apparel i.e.:

  • White or cream coloured trousers
  • Predominately white or cream coloured collared shirt

 

Opposition coaches may refuse out-of-uniform players the right to play.

 

USE OF TURF WICKETS

 

  • Turf wickets should be used if at all possible, with preference being given to the higher grade(s).
  • If 10 overs or more have been bowled on the first day (that is, the match is a two day match), the same wicket must be used on the second day of play.
  • If fewer than 10 overs have been bowled on the first day, a different wicket may be used for the following week on the second day of play.

 

  • Umpires and coaches have the responsibility of ensuring that players do not damage the turf pitch or the turf square other than normal wear and tear.

 

NUMBER OF OVERS PER BOWLER IN AN INNINGS AND DURING SPELLS

 

Two day matches:

1st Grade

  • Bowlers are limited to bowling a maximum of 25% of the allotted overs in the day’s play. For example, in a 40 over day, a bowler can bowl a maximum of only 10 overs in the day’s play.

 

2nd Grade, 15s and 14s

  • Bowlers are limited to a maximum of 25% of the allotted overs per day’s play. For example, in a 30 over day, a bowler can bowl a maximum of only 7 overs in the day’s play.

 

One day matches:

  • 1st Grade: Maximum of 5 overs per bowler in an innings (20 overs a side)
  • 2nd Grade, 15s & 14s Maximum of 5 overs per bowler in an innings (20 overs a side)

 

In the event of shortened matches:

  • Bowlers are restricted to bowling a maximum of 25% of the remaining overs left in their innings.

 

Spells:

 

Fast and medium pace bowlers

Age as at 1st of September

Max. overs in a spell

Under 19 to Under 16

6

Under 15 and Under 14

5

Under 13 and Under 12

4

 

  • A new spell must be commenced once the bowler has been rested for as many overs as he bowled from that end. For example, if a bowler bowls a three over spell he cannot bowl again until three overs have been bowled from his end. These restrictions still apply even if the spell takes place over two days
  • It is expected that the umpires and scorers keep accurate documentation of the number of overs bowled by a bowler and exactly which overs in the innings each bowler has bowled.
  • Spin bowlers are restricted to bowling a maximum of 6 overs only in a spell in any grade.

 

TWO DAY MATCHES

 

  • The team with the higher score at the end of the first innings will be the winner.
  • The side batting first must declare its first innings after facing half of the maximum number of allotted overs for the match. For example, in 1st Grade the maximum number of overs in a day’s play is 40. The side batting first must declare their innings

if they have batted 40 completed overs even if they still have wickets in hand. The same rule is to be applied to shortened matches.

  • If the scores are level then the result will be a tie regardless of the number of wickets lost.
  • If the side batting first is bowled out with more than 10 overs remaining in the day and before all of the allotted overs of the first day have been bowled, then the side batting second is entitled to receive the remaining number of overs that the side batting first were permitted in the day. Only if both coaches agree, can the remainder of the match can be completed the following week if more than 10 overs are remaining in the day.
  • For example, in 1st Grade, Side A is bowled out in 27.2 overs on the first day, Side B can then bat out 10 overs before stumps on the first day of play.

 

This is worked out as follows:

  • 40 overs in the day minus 28 overs bowled equals 12 overs remaining.
  • Then from the 12 overs remaining in the day, minus 2 overs for the change of innings which equals 10 overs remaining in the day.

 

In the event of shortened Two Day matches:

  • In the event that the side batting second has its overs curtailed by bad weather or by some other factor beyond its control, then the result will be a draw unless both sides have received at least 15 overs (20 overs in 1st Grade).
  • If both sides have received the minimum number of overs, or more, the side with the higher average run rate per completed over will be the winner.

For example, in 2nd Grade, Side A bats first and makes 3 for 104 from its 30 overs on the first day. Side B receives only 25 overs on the second day because of bad weather. 

Side B must then score 87 runs in 25 overs or fewer. 

This is worked out as follows:

Side A scored 104 runs divided by the 30 overs they faced on the first day, this total is then multiplied by the 25 overs faced by Side B which equates to 86.7.  (104/30 x 25 = 86.7)

  • Side B will win the match if it scores 87 runs or more in 25 overs or fewer.
  • Side B will tie the match if it scores 86 runs in 25 overs or fewer.
  • Side B will lose the match if it scores 85 runs or less in 25 overs or fewer.

 

ONE DAY MATCHES

 

The side with the higher total of runs after the allotted number of overs have been completed is the winner. If the scores are equal, the result is a tie regardless of the number of wickets lost.

All Grades and ages:   20 overs per side from 1pm to 3:30pm.

 

In the event of shortened One Day matches:

  • In all grade and age competition matches there must be at least 10 completed overs per side to constitute a match.
  • One over is to be deducted for every 3½ minutes lost due to weather delays.
  • If the side batting second loses some of its overs, then they will have to achieve a higher average run rate over their completed overs than the team batting first in order to win (see example above in Two Day Matches).

 

NO-BALLS AND WIDES 

(It is strongly recommended that the coaches and players be aware of the MCC rules regarding these deliveries)

 

A delivery shall be called a no-ball if:

  1. On a synthetic wicket it bounces first off the wicket or on the grass growing on the wicket before passing the batsman’s stumps.
  2. It is a full toss passing above the waist of the batsman from a medium or fast paced bowler, or it is a full toss passing above the shoulder height of the batsman from a spin bowler (wicketkeeper is standing up to the stumps).
  3. A short pitched ball rises and travels past the batsman above head height (in his normal stance) in all forms of the game.
  4. There are NO FREE HITS for no-balls bowled in any format of the game.

A delivery shall be called a wide:

  1. A ball shall be called a wide if it bounces on the wicket but then passes out of reach of the batsman in his normal stance playing a correct shot i.e. cut or hook.
  2. There are NO LEG SIDE WIDES in any game format unless the delivery is out of reach of the batsman in his normal stance. However, constant leg side bowling should attract wide calls.
  3. Note that if a batsman hits the ball, no matter how wide it is, it cannot by definition be called a wide.
  • In all mentioned cases above, but not limited to, the penalty will be 1 run plus an extra ball to be bowled.

 

 

LEG BEFORE WICKET (LBW)

(It is strongly recommended that the coaches and players be aware of the MCC rules regarding this mode of dismissal)

 

Some rules for the umpires, coaches and players to be aware of regarding this mode of dismissal:

  1. A batsman cannot be given out LBW if he has hit the ball first with his bat or hand/glove holding the bat.
  2. A batsman cannot be given out LBW if the ball from the bowler has pitched/landed first on the wicket outside the line of leg stump, even if the ball was going on to hit the stumps.
  3. A ball hitting the batsman on the full does not necessarily mean that the they are automatically out. The umpire must be sure that the line of ball tracking is heading for the stumps. For example, a swinging ball may hit the batsman on the full in front of the stumps but the tracking of the ball could mean that the swinging ball could in fact be missing the stumps after passing the batsman.

 

POINTS

 

Win

4 pts

Win with bonus point

5 pts

Draw/Tie

2 pts

Loss

1 pt.

Loss on forfeit

0 pts

Bye

0 pts

 

NoteThere are no outright results from the 2011-2012 season onwards. Teams, however, have the ability to gain a bonus point through one of the following two ways. Scenario one is available to the team bowling second, whilst scenario 2 is available to the team batting second.

 

Scenario 1 – Bowling the opposition out for 60% or less of your total score.

E.g. (1st Grade) Team A bats first and scores 140. To obtain a bonus point Team A must then bowl team B out for 60% or less of their total. ie. Team A will obtain a bonus point if they bowl Team B out for 84 or less. 

 

Scenario 2 – Chasing the runs within 60% of the allocated overs.

E.g. (1st Grade) Team A bats first and scores 140. To obtain a bonus point Team B must then score the runs within 60% of the allocated overs. I.e. Team B will obtain a bonus point in First Grade if they score the runs by the completion of the 24th over.

 

(All other grades) Team A bats first and scores 140. To obtain a bonus point Team B must then score the runs within 60% of the allocated overs. I.e. Team B will obtain a bonus point in all other grades if they score the runs by the completion of the 18th over.